Maximizing your cover letter’s power

Maximizing your cover letter’s power

Maximizing your cover letter’s power

Like peanut butter and jelly or bacon and eggs, resumes and cover letters go hand-in-hand. Although both pieces are valuable on their own, they pack the most punch when served together. But while all job seekers know the importance of a well-organized resume, many don’t understand the power of a strong cover letter.

In addition to reinforcing key skills and experience, a cover letter demonstrates your desire to work for the employer and the specific ways in which your expertise can benefit the firm. More importantly, it helps differentiate you from other job seekers and provides incentive to contact you for an interview.

Even if composition isn’t your forte, you can still create a killer cover letter. Here’s how:

1. Know your stuff.
Before you begin writing, learn as much as you can about the potential employer. Visit the firm’s Web site and scan industry publications to familiarize yourself with recent news about the company, such as quarterly earnings, and to learn about future plans, like expansion into new markets. The more you know about an organization, the better you can tailor your cover letter to the firm’s needs.

2. Personalize it.
Never begin a cover letter with Dear Sir or Madam or To Whom it May Concern. Correspondence with generic salutations often signal to potential employers that you lack the initiative to locate the appropriate contact. If a job listing does not include the name of the hiring manager, call the company’s receptionist and explain the position you are applying for to see if he or she can help you fill in the blank.

3. Start strong.
A good cover letter begins with a powerful opening paragraph. Your goal is to briefly describe how you heard about the position and why you’re interested in it. Skip cute introductions: Teamwork is my middle name or I am smart as a whip, for example. A catchy opening can appear stilted and insincere and offers little, if any, value to the piece.

4. Offer an enticement.
The body of the letter should expand upon ” not simply repeat ” the key points in your resume. Highlight those skills and experiences most relevant to the job opening and provide concrete examples of how you can benefit the company. For example, if you are applying for a management position, share how turnover within your department decreased by 20 percent during your tenure. Or communicate how your attention to detail and ability to adapt quickly to new environments allow you to deliver first-rate client service.

5. Be bold.
In addition to expressing gratitude for the hiring manager’s time and interest, close your letter by outlining your next steps. Be proactive by stating when you will contact him or her to follow up. Doing so is a great way to reinforce your enthusiasm for the job. However, don’t forget to include a phone number or e-mail address where you can be reached in case the firm wants to get in touch with you first.

As always, you can count on EresumeX for your free resume search.

~Dawn Krovicka